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Poor substitute

According to a newly released report, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control itself now admits that the protective benefits of the COVID jab are only temporary and wear off in about six months.

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This means people who took the shot in the spring are now nearing the end of any effectiveness it may originally have had. It also explains why an increasing number of fully vaccinated people are coming down with COVID.

In my opinion, rolling up my sleeve every few months for another jab is a poor substitute for the robust long-lasting immunity that is naturally acquired after exposure to the virus in one form or another. Furthermore, the almost exclusive concentration on vaccination neglects other preventative treatments proven to be effective.

Werner Broschinski
Princeton

Hot air

Re: Climate talks deliver moves to cut methane (Nov. 3)

The article states that  deforestation will stop in 2030. Any bets that the worst offenders will increase their clear cutting and, in 2030, will say: “We stopped clear cutting?”

I wonder what the temperature is in Glasgow with all the hot air being spewed? And what is the carbon footprint of all the private jets?

Steve Whines
Brantford

Embrace all customs

This time of year, social media is flooded with posts from the far right bemoaning the fact that they can’t say “Merry Christmas.”

Hatred, instead of goodwill, is spread as these extremists suggest that these who don’t like “Merry Christmas” go back to the country from which they came. I have a suggestion: Embrace all the diverse customs of people in this great country.

Say “Happy Diwali” to your neighbours originally from India and other parts of Asia. Say “Happy Kwanza” to your neighbours originally from Africa. Say “Happy Hanukkah” to your Jewish neighbours. Say “Merry Christmas” to your Christian neighbours. To all the rest, say “Happy Holidays.”

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Love and enlightenment are the messages of all of these groups, which is much more appropriate than hatred.

Freda Goulet
Brantford

Truly sinful

I have heard the Liberal carbon tax termed a “sin tax.” This tax is designed to punish those of us who consume fossil fuel in our daily lives in an effort to change our behaviour and move to energy sources that are more sustainable. Commuting to work, trips for groceries, heating our homes, pretty much everything we do requires some amount of fossil fuel — none of which I would consider committing a sin. The sin, in my opinion, is imposing punitive measures that affect even the most vulnerable of us while having no reliable alternative energy source.

Wind and solar, which supply three per cent of the world’s energy needs, are marginal at best when considering there is no current method of storing energy from those sources to accommodate the enormous demand. Other sources, such as hydrogen, geothermal, tidal, wave, hydroelectric and biomass, all have uniquely prohibitive traits.

Additionally sinful is the declaration that nuclear power is too dangerous an energy source. Minimal amounts of radiation were released during the three most media hyped nuclear events in history, Three Mile Island 1979, Chernobyl 1986 and Fukushima 2011. If we honestly believe we are under an existential threat from climate change, then why would we ignore a safe and abundant energy source such as nuclear power generation?

Our current administration is far too politically engaged with virtue signalling and promoting the UN’s plan for wealth distribution — truly sinful.

Garry Goold
Brantford

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