From the Archives - Tillsonburg News (July 22-27)

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July 22-27 archives from The Tillsonburg News and The Tillsonburg Observer.

NEW STEAM PRINTING PRESS(July 27, 1871)

The Observer of last week was printed on the new steam printing press made specially to order by Harrild & Sons, Fleet Works, London, England. It is a splendid piece of machinery and does beautiful work. We are now prepared to do all kinds of work as cheap as in the cities.

 

NEW WHEAT (July 27, 1871)

On the 24th, a lot of new wheat was ground at Tillson mill. The miller says it is the best sample of wheat he has seen in several years.

 

HORSE RUNS DOWN BROADWAY (July 24, 1891)

A horse belonging to JOHN HUTCHISON, proprietor of Royal Hotel, which had been driven to the fairgrounds and there tied up, on Monday, got its bridle off and ran away, coming down Broadway at a rattling pace to its stable. No particular damage was done to either the horse or buggy.

In Springford, a buggy and wagon collided on the Springford bridge Wednesday. The buggy, which was occupied by four ladies, was badly wrecked.

In Culloden, W.T. CROSBY, who was driving a colt belonging to James Lands, was dumped out into the ditch a few nights ago by the colt backing him down a steep embankment rather than crossing a culvert.

 

COWS KILLED (July 26, 1906)

RODGER HAWKINS of Brownsville had 18 cows killed, two so badly injured that they are expected to die, and several others injured by an MCR train a few days ago. There were 30 cows on the company’s right of way when the accident happened.

 

NEAR MIRACLE ON BROADWAY (July 26, 1906)

MAXWELL BARRETT, son of S.E. Barrett, had a very narrow escape from a bad accident on Wednesday afternoon. The lad was driving a horse attached to a dray, and near the B&T station the horse became frightened and ran away. It came down Broadway at a very fast clip and at the corner of Broadway and Baldwin Street the rig hit a telegraph pole. This stopped the horse and threw the boy, who was wound up in the reins, some distance. The lad rolled several times but was found to be unhurt.

How he managed to stick to the dray so well and get off without injury is next thing to a miracle.

 

TILLSONBURG’S FIRST WAR ORDER COMPLETED (July 24, 1941)

Shipment was made this week by the Beaver Foundry and Furnace Works of the first and only work to be completed in Tillsonburg for the war which is now nearing the close of its second year.

The plant has made a number of heavy turf rollers for maintenance of airways at the RCAF airports. Each roller bears a stencil painting of the name of the manufacturing firm and the address of Tillsonburg, Ontario. The order was finished a few weeks ahead of schedule, indicating splendid co-operation and efficiency on the part of all local citizens, under the management of R.C. CRANDALL.

 

2,000 ACRES DAMAGED (July 24, 1941)

Approximately 2,000 acres of tobacco were affected in the hailstorm on Wednesday. RJ Stallwood said 70-75 per cent of the farms had suffered practically total loss, it being too late now to replant. He estimated the loss at 1,000,000 to 1,500,000 pounds.

 

CIRCUS IN BROWNSVILLE (July 24, 1941)

RONALD VINCENT, ROSS BARNHARDT, RAY KNOWLES, JEAN and ALVIN JACOB were circus proprietors in Brownsville last week.

A lemonade stand of candied and buttered popcorn, all-day suckers and balloons sold out.

The chief sports of the day were dart throwing, marble shooting, pool shooting, and BB rifle practice, which provided lots of excitement.

The caged animals were five quints and the mystery box. Pony rides attracted young and old. The feature of the day was the fat clown, who, after much guessing, proved to be Ross Barnhardt, performing on the back of a pony. He was so immense that one of the smaller fry ran home and never returned.

In the evening the circus finale was a motion picture show in the barn. Between the reels, the famous clown and a two-year-old boy, DONALD SINCLAIR, entertained.

A huge success, organizers were delighted with the result, which amounted to $5.65.

 

CANADIAN JAMBOREE (July 23, 1963)

Three Tillsonburg Queen Scouts – JACK EACOTT, MARSUN LIPSITT, and JACK POPHAM – are this week attending the Canadian Boy Scout jamboree at Connaught Ranges near Ottawa.

 

TRAIN WRECKS STOLEN AUTO LEFT ON TRACKS (July 23, 1963)

A car stolen from a Tillsonburg early yesterday morning and later abandoned on a railroad was badly smashed when a CPR train was in collision with it. The collision occurred on the railroad between the eighth and ninth concessions of Dereham.

The car had been apparently been driven through several farm fields before being lodged on the tracks. It is believed an attempt was being made to cross the railroad when the car became stuck on the tracks and was abandoned.

Owner of the car, KEITH SOMERS, had left it parked in his driveway. He heard it being started at 2:50 a.m., and looking out, saw it being driven away.

 

HAIL BATTERS CROPS (July 23, 1963)

A severe electrical and hail storm struck in the Otterville district yesterday causing thousands of dollars of damage to tobacco and grain crops. Several have reported 100 per cent loss.

It started east of Springford and followed the county road to Otterville where it lashed out at full intensity. It eased off then appeared to circle around, striking between Salford and Mount Elgin, going on to London.

Otterville was in the very centre of the storm. STEVE SZUBA had 150 panes of glass broken in his greenhouse. Other district farmers who suffered extensive damage were Achiel DeGroote, Bernard Robeys, Albert Delaene, Lyle Davis, Eugene Baret, Joseph Ladosz, Tony Drescher, and John Vandenberghe.

 

 

 

 

SCOUTS RETURN FROM KENTUCKY (July 22, 1988)

Scout leader DON MARSHALL packed up the 3rd Tillsonburg Scouts bus on June 23, and set out for nine days of non-stop touring and traveling to reach Kentucky.

Highlights included an eight-mile canoe trip, and camping in Boonesborough State Park Cumberland Falls.

 

OTTER PUBLISHING SOLD (July 27, 1988)

The Tillsonburg News comes under new ownership next week with sale of shares of Otter Publishing Ltd to Newfoundland Capital Corporation Ltd.

Otter Publishing, based in Tillsonburg, presently publishes The Tillsonburg News, Ingersoll Times, Norwich Gazette, Caledonia Grand River Sachem, and Paris This Week, as well as operating Otter Printing and The Copy Shop in Tillsonburg.

 

chris.abbott@sunmedia.ca

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